Arctic blast

Updates

  1. Originally published, May 5, 11:24 am.
  2. May 5, 5:56 pm:
    • Eleven years ago today, I traveled to a vegan deli in Oakland, California, and tried a sandwich. I concluded that “fake” meat would be sufficient and since that evening, I have tried as much as possible to live a plant-based lifestyle.
    • Laurence Tribe has expressed support for impeachment. However, he also points to an “opposing” view.[1] Well, not quite. Will Bunch richly acknowledges all the arguments against impeachment, but essentially argues that it is the moral, even if futile, thing to do.[2] Which is really pretty much the same argument as Tribe’s. My problem is I don’t think empty actions count. And an empty action in defense of a system that gave us a choice between two utterly despicable candidates, Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, and enabled the latter to become president just doesn’t seem like a path forward to me.
    • Um, oops. Really big oops. It seems Boeing knew about problems with the 737 MAX cockpit alert system and didn’t tell anybody. And even when it did start admitting to the problem, it did so selectively and incompletely, to some airlines and pilots sooner than others if at all, and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) accepted that the problem was, as Boeing claimed, not a threat to safety. Apparently, it remains unclear if fixing this would have prevented two notorious crashes that have led to grounding of the entire fleet.[3]
  3. May 5, 10:00 pm:
    • I don’t want to say that Mehdi Hasan is right about the possibility Donald Trump might refuse to leave office if impeached or defeated.[4] I also can’t tell you he’s wrong.

At eight o’clock on a Sunday morning, church bells are ringing. I forgot to mention about church bells yesterday.

They ring church bells here. It doesn’t last long but they do ring them. This doesn’t happen much in California. And I suspect, in California, if somebody did this, somebody’d call the police: There’d better be an actual fucking emergency if you’re going to wake me up at that hour.

As it happens, though, I was already awake. I have not yet returned to my normal sleeping patterns.

It’s been raining, gently, all night. It was delicious to leave the windows open until, this morning, after I was already up, it turned cold. I put a couple waffles in the microwave and was mostly cured.

One—only one—of the features that keeps us guessing about Pittsburgh weather is that there really isn’t that much, except distance, between us and the Arctic. The terrain here, and to the north, is mostly rolling hills and valleys, enough to give the land texture, nowhere near enough to block the occasional arctic blast.


I am still furious about Duquesne Light. And apart from the fact that lying to me takes me from zero to furious in nothing flat, it is also an obstruction.

I know that whatever the problem actually is, it isn’t what they claim it is. Which means I can’t, even if I have the capability, address the actual problem because I don’t know what it even is.

And in the meantime, I have shared what the Census Bureau calls “personally identifiable information,” the stuff that’s supposed to be protected at all costs on pain of a felony (if memory serves, five years prison, $15,000 fine) there, with an operation that lies to me.

It is just this sort of callous disregard that gives bureaucracy a bad name. But an important note: This isn’t government bureaucracy. It’s private enterprise, the allegedly superior and more efficient corporate, bureaucracy.

Duquesne Light has a horrendous reputation, apparently dating back decades—my mother said, “Oh, Duquesne Light.” I could hear the tone of painful recognition in her voice. I don’t know if they were this bad when she was a kid, or if they were this bad when we lived here when I was a kid, or if they were this bad when she came back here briefly while moving back from Washington, D.C., to the San Francisco Bay Area. In any case, it’s been decades.

I spoke to the leasing office folks about the situation because 1) they need to be kept apprised of the account number, and 2) I needed them to fax (for free) the application, lease, and my drivers license, yet again (the second attempt with this). They rolled their eyes: “Duquesne is the worst.” The lady there I’ve worked with most said that, in her experience, the blurred documents excuse is their “go-to” when they don’t know what went wrong.

Neoliberalism may not be the cause of Duquesne’s problems. But my experience here demonstrates that the neoliberal mantra that anything corporate is better than anything government is clearly and flatly wrong. There is absolutely no logic or evidence offered in support of that mantra and those who espouse it deserve to put to work digging their own mass grave, preferably with their bare hands in dry, rocky soil, then crucified, shallowly drawn and quartered, and then shot, but this last only when they’re still conscious but already so close to death that they aren’t feeling the pain. I want them to feel the despair of impending death, die slowly, excruciatingly, and fall into the grave, not out of it. Nobody should deal with them, or their corpses, ever again.

Or maybe we can find wasps to lay their eggs in neoliberals and let the larvae eat them alive. (How many wasps would that take, per neoliberal?)

At least with PennDOT, my recent experience with government bureaucracy, there’s a step-by-step process. Their website is misleading, I had to excruciatingly and painfully feel my way through to find the correct process, but I’ve now accomplished nearly everything I set out to. I’m pretty sure (possibly overconfident) I’ve got everything lined up so I can complete that this Thursday. (I’m running out of money; it’d be nice to start earning it again.)

With Duquesne, there isn’t even that. I got an account number from them with one of their missives, but what they’re telling me to is clearly wrong, based on lies. Whether they’re institutional lies, produced by computers and relayed by unwitting humans, or individual lies, meant by workers to cover their own individual asses, doesn’t matter to me. They’re lies. And apparently, they lie a lot.


My kitchen is finally starting to look like a kitchen. Only starting. I’ve had new dishes, silverware, glasses, and knives still in their original wrapping—I needed them right away—sitting on the bigger-than-some-but-still-small kitchen counter. And they needed washing, hence the need for dishwashing stuff, and putting away, hence the need for shelf lining. All that stuff finally arrived yesterday, from Amazon, which apparently recognizes that yes, some folks do still wash dishes.


Brexit

Brexit still looks to be either coming down hard or not at all. They keep spinning their wheels but the damnable outcome remains the same. I think the “herding cats” metaphor might not be adequate here.

Toby Helm and Michael Savage, “Brexit: anger grows at May-Corbyn bid to stitch up deal,” Guardian, May 5, 2019, https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2019/may/04/anger-grows-may-corbyn-bid-stitch-up-brexit-deal


Donald Trump

It appears I misunderstood the context of a comment by Jamie Raskin, who said, “If they want to impeach the president, they should go ahead and introduce the articles.”[5] On May 3rd, I wrote:

I still agree with Nancy Pelosi on impeachment. As Jamie Raskin put it, “If they want to impeach the president so badly they should introduce the articles today, and I bet you a lot of Democrats are ready to join them.”[6] Raskin has a point: For all the calls for impeachment, no one has actually introduced articles of impeachment and, surely, everyone understands what happens when impeachment reaches the Senate. Which suggests rather strongly that all this talk is mere grandstanding.[7]

Jamie Raskin was very likely referring to Republicans seeking to goad Democrats into impeachment rather than already-goaded Democrats.[8] I have inserted a correction into that issue of the Irregular Bullshit.

Since then, the argument has gotten interesting. Laurence Tribe has weighed in, in support of impeachment, saying:

Will Bunch, “Trump’s diabolical plan to blow up democracy, get reelected and avoid jail just might work,” Philadelphia Inquirer, May 5, 2019, https://www.philly.com/opinion/commentary/trump-wants-impeachment-2020-reelection-strategy-blame-democrats-ignore-subpoenas-20190505.html

Mike Lillis and Cristina Marcos, “Dems see GOP effort to drive them to impeach Trump,” Hill, May 5, 2019, https://thehill.com/homenews/house/442115-dems-see-gop-effort-to-drive-them-to-impeach-trump

Mehdi Hasan, “Yes, Let’s Defeat or Impeach Donald Trump. But What If He Refuses to Leave the White House?” Intercept, March 6, 2019, https://theintercept.com/2019/03/06/donald-trump-impeachment-2020/


Gaza Strip

Apparently about a year before the U.S. Declaration of Independence, Samuel Johnson declared that “patriotism is the last refuge of a scoundrel.” I believe he was in error, but perhaps only because Twitter and Instagram didn’t exist yet: Dead baby pictures are the last resort of a scoundrel. And both Israelis and Gazans are posting them.

Judah Ari Gross, “Gearing up for days of fighting, IDF sends tank reinforcements to Gaza border,” Times of Israel, May 5, 2019, https://www.timesofisrael.com/gearing-up-for-days-of-fighting-idf-sends-tank-reinforcements-to-gaza-border/


Boeing

I’m just going to go out on a limb here and predict that Boeing’s stock will take a nosedive tomorrow.

Andy Pasztor, Andrew Tangel, and Alison Sider, “Boeing Knew About Safety-Alert Problem for a Year Before Telling FAA, Airlines,” Wall Street Journal, May 5, 2019, https://www.wsj.com/articles/boeing-knew-about-safety-alert-problem-for-a-year-before-telling-faa-airlines-11557087129


 

  1. [1]Laurence Tribe, [microblog post], May 5, 2019, https://twitter.com/tribelaw/status/1125110933490163712
  2. [2]Will Bunch, “Trump’s diabolical plan to blow up democracy, get reelected and avoid jail just might work,” Philadelphia Inquirer, May 5, 2019, https://www.philly.com/opinion/commentary/trump-wants-impeachment-2020-reelection-strategy-blame-democrats-ignore-subpoenas-20190505.html
  3. [3]Andy Pasztor, Andrew Tangel, and Alison Sider, “Boeing Knew About Safety-Alert Problem for a Year Before Telling FAA, Airlines,” Wall Street Journal, May 5, 2019, https://www.wsj.com/articles/boeing-knew-about-safety-alert-problem-for-a-year-before-telling-faa-airlines-11557087129
  4. [4]Mehdi Hasan, “Yes, Let’s Defeat or Impeach Donald Trump. But What If He Refuses to Leave the White House?” Intercept, March 6, 2019, https://theintercept.com/2019/03/06/donald-trump-impeachment-2020/
  5. [5]Jamie Raskin, quoted in Mike Lillis and Cristina Marcos, “Dems see GOP effort to drive them to impeach Trump,” Hill, May 5, 2019, https://thehill.com/homenews/house/442115-dems-see-gop-effort-to-drive-them-to-impeach-trump
  6. [6]Jamie B. Raskin, quoted in Mike DeBonis and Rachael Bade, “Pelosi escalates attacks on Trump, compares him to Nixon, as Barr’s defiance angers Democrats,” Washington Post, May 2, 2019, https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/pelosi-escalates-attacks-on-trump-compares-him-to-nixon-as-barrs-defiance-angers-democrats/2019/05/02/e4580542-6cf1-11e9-8f44-e8d8bb1df986_story.html
  7. [7]David Benfell, “Grandstanding on impeachment,” Irregular Bullshit, May 3, 2019, https://disunitedstates.com/2019/05/03/grandstanding-on-impeachment/
  8. [8]Mike Lillis and Cristina Marcos, “Dems see GOP effort to drive them to impeach Trump,” Hill, May 5, 2019, https://thehill.com/homenews/house/442115-dems-see-gop-effort-to-drive-them-to-impeach-trump

Socioculturally different

A correction has been added, in line, to this post.



Updates

  1. Originally published, May 4, 2019, 3:29 pm.
  2. May 4, 7:45 pm:
    • I am seeing numerous reports on Twitter that Israel is bombing Gaza again. After all, it’s been so enormously successful when they’ve done it before. None of my news sources have picked this up.
    • I haven’t even finished dealing with the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) and another very ugly bureaucracy, Duquesne Light, is rearing its head. I have now made four attempts to satisfy their documentation requests. They keep insisting that my drivers license is blurry. But you see, I can look at the verification copies from the fax machine. I can look at the images I’ve sent them via email. These images are all, each and every one of them, crystal clear. Duquesne Light is lying. And lying for no good reason. I am not okay with this. Really not okay.
  3. May 4, 8:57 pm:
    • I have filed an informal complaint with the Pennsylvania Public Utilities Commission about Duquesne Light. This is a first step. The next step would be a formal complaint.
    • There may be, and have been, funkiness with times associated with the Irregular Bullshit. I only just discovered I needed to change the timezone since coming east.
  4. May 4, 11:37 pm:
    • Tweeted about the Gaza Strip attacks. The text now leads this issue (see above).

I’ve been noticing the churches here in Pittsburgh.

In California, and I think generally out west, grand structures are rare. Some evangelical Protestant churches can be found in old movie theaters, other storefronts, and sometimes even people’s houses. Relative to Pittsburgh, the churches are generally much smaller.

The Pittsburgh area features streets, such as Bethel Church and Lebanon Church. The churches here, relative to California, carry the appearance of a competition to see who could build the most glorious structure. They look like what one might expect to find in Europe.

Part of this is the timing. European-origin settlement of California didn’t really get started until the Gold Rush in 1849. Here, it is common for municipalities to post the years they were established—the examples I’ve seen have been from the late 18th century.

But I suspect there’s more to it than the timing. The Gold Rush was its own phenomenon. I think, in a sense, it paved the way for Silicon Valley. In this frame, California emerges as a “get rich quick” kind of place where extreme social inequality is the rule.

Pittsburgh began as Fort Pitt (which—thanks Mom for the correction added May 6, 11:09 am—had previously been Fort Duquesne under the French), at the confluence of the Allegheny and Monongahela Rivers (forming the Ohio River). I don’t know much of the history here but settlement here in this area was part of what the revolution that separated the U.S. from Britain was about—the U.K. parliament had passed the Quebec Act, reserving this territory for American Indians, and the colonists hated that.[1] This was territory that had been contested by the British, the French, the newly founded U.S., and, all too often forgotten, American Indians.

The psychological and sociological history of this place is different. How, precisely, that translates to grand churches is a question I have not yet sorted out. But seeing this, I now understand what I didn’t before about Colin Woodard and his sociocultural regions.[2]

Having lived in California nearly all my life (over fifty years), I had seen that once you get outside the Bay Area “bubble,” politics often orient in a much more conservative direction. The Central Valley, for example, is California’s Bible Belt. As Democrats have established one-party control of the state government, effectively disenfranchised conservatives (at least some authoritarian populists) in both far northern California and in southern California have attempted secession movements, trying and failing to break California up.

But I had never experienced such a different sense of place. Pittsburgh is different. And not just because of the weather. Even if I think Woodard may have lacked nuance in developing his archetypes for eleven different sociocultural regions and drew sharp borders instead of frontiers, this area is socioculturally different, supporting his notion of distinct regions.


Job Hunting

Ryan Nunn, Jana Parsons, and Jay Shambaugh, “How difficult is it to find a job?” Brookings, May 2, 2019, https://www.brookings.edu/blog/up-front/2019/05/02/how-difficult-is-it-to-find-a-job/


Aristocracy

George Monbiot, “Landlocked,” May 3, 2019, https://www.monbiot.com/2019/05/03/landlocked/


Joe Biden

Shia Kapos, “Chicago mayor-elect: Biden still has to answer for Anita Hill,” Politico, May 4, 2019, https://www.politico.com/story/2019/05/04/joe-biden-anita-hill-2020-1301449


Brexit

British voters are fed up.[3] But I think the real problem lies someplace other than with the politicians.

Yes, the politicians are idiots. Yes, they are, to borrow a negative connotation, “strivers” more interested in personal advancement than in the jobs they were elected to do. Of course they are. But how, really, can you expect anything better? This is the result of so-called “representative democracy.”

On the U.S. side of the pond, James Madison called it a republic, a term which would not strictly apply in Britain, but with the same failing: Madison trusted the rich with power on the ludicrous notion that they would best be able to set aside their own interests in favor of the country.[4] A republic, or a representative democracy, generally requires resources that only the wealthy can muster to run for office.

So you get a bunch of shitheads who have absolutely no clue what life is really like on the other side of the social barriers they erect to separate themselves from the rest of the population. And you shouldn’t even remotely be surprised when this happens.

This is a systemic problem. Brexit is just one example.

Heather Stewart and Patrick Wintour, “Tories lose over 1,300 seats in local elections as major parties suffer,” Guardian, May 3, 2019, https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2019/may/03/tories-lose-over-1200-seats-in-local-elections-as-major-parties-suffer


Uber

“We’re not going to have predictable profitability,” Mr. [Dara] Khosrowshahi said at a talk at Stanford University’s business school in November. “We’ll say it to our shareholders and the shareholders can choose.”

“If they want a predictably profitable company–go buy a bank,” he added with a shrug. “Really the long-term is what we’re after.”[5]

Eliot Brown, “Uber Wants to Be the Uber of Everything—But Can It Make a Profit?” Wall Street Journal, May 4, 2019, https://www.wsj.com/articles/uber-wants-to-be-the-uber-of-everything-11556909866


  1. [1]Lawrence James, The Rise and Fall of the British Empire (New York: St. Martin’s Griffin, 1994).
  2. [2]Colin Woodard, American Nations: A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America (New York: Penguin, 2011).
  3. [3]Heather Stewart and Patrick Wintour, “Tories lose over 1,300 seats in local elections as major parties suffer,” Guardian, May 3, 2019, https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2019/may/03/tories-lose-over-1200-seats-in-local-elections-as-major-parties-suffer
  4. [4]James Madison, “Federalist No. 10,” in The Federalist Papers, ed. Garry Wills (1982; repr., New York: Bantam, 2003), 50-58.
  5. [5]Eliot Brown, “Uber Wants to Be the Uber of Everything—But Can It Make a Profit?” Wall Street Journal, May 4, 2019, https://www.wsj.com/articles/uber-wants-to-be-the-uber-of-everything-11556909866

Grandstanding on impeachment

Note: There is a correction, in line, in this issue, under Donald Trump.


I have finally managed to get enough stuff put away that I can offer the first photographs of my new place:

The Pennsylvania drivers license arrived today but Allstate offered a discount if I delayed the policy start date a week. So I’m still not ready to transfer the title here, still not ready to drive for Uber and Lyft.

The new policy takes effect on the 9th.


Horse race

Max Greenwood, “Warren shows signs of momentum after slow start,” Hill, May 3, 2019, https://thehill.com/homenews/campaign/441902-warren-shows-signs-of-momentum-after-slow-start


Donald Trump

“We are in a very, very, very challenging place, because we have a Republican Party that is complicit in the special-interest agenda . . . so they are not going to say anything,” [Nancy Pelosi] said at the news conference. “Impeachment is the easy way out for some of these people because they know it will end at the Senate’s edge.”[1]

That said,

“Ignoring subpoenas of Congress, not honoring subpoenas of Congress — that was Article 3 of the Nixon impeachment,” [Pelosi] said [at an earlier closed-door meeting of Congress members], according to notes taken by a person present for the remarks. “This person has not only ignored subpoenas, he has said he’s not going to honor any subpoenas. What more do we want?”[2]

I still agree with Nancy Pelosi on impeachment. As Jamie Raskin put it, “If they want to impeach the president so badly they should introduce the articles today, and I bet you a lot of Democrats are ready to join them.”[3] Raskin has a point: For all the calls for impeachment, no one has actually introduced articles of impeachment and, surely, everyone understands what happens when impeachment reaches the Senate. Which suggests rather strongly that all this talk is mere grandstanding. (Update, May 5, 8:46 am: It appears I misunderstood the pronoun, “they.” Raskin appears to have been referring to Republicans who are seeking to goad Democrats into impeachment.[4] I thought he was referring to Democrats pushing for impeachment.)

Flatly, impeachment isn’t going to work. We do need to get rid of Donald Trump, Michael Pence and this entire administration. But I’m not seeing a viable plan for accomplishing this. (And no, I don’t trust the U.S. electorate to not re-elect him. I’ve seen too many of his predecessors get re-elected.)

Mike DeBonis and Rachael Bade, “Pelosi escalates attacks on Trump, compares him to Nixon, as Barr’s defiance angers Democrats,” Washington Post, May 2, 2019, https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/pelosi-escalates-attacks-on-trump-compares-him-to-nixon-as-barrs-defiance-angers-democrats/2019/05/02/e4580542-6cf1-11e9-8f44-e8d8bb1df986_story.html


  1. [1]Mike DeBonis and Rachael Bade, “Pelosi escalates attacks on Trump, compares him to Nixon, as Barr’s defiance angers Democrats,” Washington Post, May 2, 2019, https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/pelosi-escalates-attacks-on-trump-compares-him-to-nixon-as-barrs-defiance-angers-democrats/2019/05/02/e4580542-6cf1-11e9-8f44-e8d8bb1df986_story.html
  2. [2]Mike DeBonis and Rachael Bade, “Pelosi escalates attacks on Trump, compares him to Nixon, as Barr’s defiance angers Democrats,” Washington Post, May 2, 2019, https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/pelosi-escalates-attacks-on-trump-compares-him-to-nixon-as-barrs-defiance-angers-democrats/2019/05/02/e4580542-6cf1-11e9-8f44-e8d8bb1df986_story.html
  3. [3]Jamie B. Raskin, quoted in Mike DeBonis and Rachael Bade, “Pelosi escalates attacks on Trump, compares him to Nixon, as Barr’s defiance angers Democrats,” Washington Post, May 2, 2019, https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/pelosi-escalates-attacks-on-trump-compares-him-to-nixon-as-barrs-defiance-angers-democrats/2019/05/02/e4580542-6cf1-11e9-8f44-e8d8bb1df986_story.html
  4. [4]Mike Lillis and Cristina Marcos, “Dems see GOP effort to drive them to impeach Trump,” Hill, May 5, 2019, https://thehill.com/homenews/house/442115-dems-see-gop-effort-to-drive-them-to-impeach-trump

Not washing dishes

Apparently, people in the Pittsburgh area do not wash dishes.

I have gone to multiple places now, in search of 1) a dish rack, 2) various sorts of scrubbing sponges, 3) a silverware tray, and 4) shelf liners. I even broke down and went into Walmart. As near as I can tell, these items are flatly not available in the Pittsburgh area.

In general, shopping here sucks even more—my mother will be shocked—than in California. The Whole Foods Markets are pathetic. Bed Bath and Beyond is missing about half the stuff that their California counterparts carry. Target, likewise.

Meanwhile, The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) puts California’s Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) utterly and absolutely to shame.

California’s DMV has recently been in the news for long wait times. The DMV there has always been bad—I remember long waits when I was getting my first learner’s permit, oh, somewhere around 44 years ago—and it is an art, rather than a science, to find offices with reasonable wait times. I guess it’d gotten worse.

But at least you can go into a DMV office in California with a reasonable assurance that you can accomplish your business. At least until REAL ID came along.

Remember that I drive for Uber and Lyft. I need this shit straightened out. But PennDOT always wants one more thing.

Their website claims you have twenty days to register your car and sixty days to transfer your drivers license. Further, it says, there is nothing stopping you from registering your car while you sort out your drivers license.

The clerks have another story. Even for a non-REAL ID license, they want your physical Social Security card. Social Security numbers can be verified online and indeed when it comes to replacing a lost card, the Social Security Administration thinks you don’t actually need a physical copy.

And you have to have the Pennsylvania drivers license and Pennsylvania automobile insurance (thanks, AAA for not insuring Uber and Lyft drivers—now I get to pay twice as much for insurance) before you can register the car.

But you have to wait for the REAL ID drivers license in the mail.

Further, you will likely have to go to multiple offices in order to accomplish all this. Because some locations sort out the drivers license paperwork, but don’t take the pictures—they issue what’s called a “camera card,” which you may have to take to yet another location to get your picture taken. And then there are offices that deal with vehicle registration. Some of these overlap, with locations serving more than one function, and PennDOT’s website offers a search function where you can specify all that you need to do: There wasn’t an office that does everything I needed to do, at least anywhere near Pittsburgh.

It might be even more complicated than this—I hope not—because this is only my first experience with PennDOT. I’d just about bet that there are more wrinkles yet in store.


Pittsburgh has moved from early to mid-Spring now. Leaves have come in on the trees and the weather has shifted to alternates of hot and muggy with subsequent refreshing rain. Tonight, there is lightning and even a bit of thunder.


Cuba

Deutschewelle, “EU says will respond to controversial US move on Cuba,” May 2, 2019, https://www.dw.com/en/eu-says-will-respond-to-controversial-us-move-on-cuba/a-48569649


Facebook

Suhauna Hussain, “Facebook bans Alex Jones and other controversial figures for hate speech,” Los Angeles Times, May 2, 2019, https://www.latimes.com/business/technology/la-fi-tn-facebook-ban-alex-jones-milo-yiannopoulos-20190502-story.html


Hannah Arendt

Totalitarian states make people into cogs in an administrative machine, [Hannah] Arendt argued, “dehumanizing them.” Worse, she said, this might even be a feature of all modern bureaucracies.[1]

Paul Mason, “Reading Arendt Is Not Enough,” New York Review of Books, May 2, 2019, https://www.nybooks.com/daily/2019/05/02/reading-arendt-is-not-enough/


Uber

Farhad Manjoo, “The Uber I.P.O. Is a Moral Stain on Silicon Valley,” New York Times, May 1, 2019, https://www.nytimes.com/2019/05/01/opinion/uber-ipo.html


Moral Panics

The story of a school newspaper being rebuffed by the school principal and the district superintendent in reporting on a student working in the pornography business[2] would seem to have a happy ending.[3]

The earlier story[4] was confusing about the location of the school in question. Lodi is (or, at least, was) a small town south of Sacramento and north of Stockton in California’s Central Valley. Bear Creek High School is apparently located in the northern outskirts of Stockton but part of the Lodi district.[5]

Sawsan Morrar, “School newspaper gets Lodi district’s OK to publish story about student who works in porn,” Sacramento Bee, May 2,2019, https://www.sacbee.com/news/local/education/article229945129.html


Disaster Relief

The San Francisco Chronicle story of course highlights the California angle, but more fundamentally, this is a story about Donald Trump’s vindictiveness toward Puerto Rico getting in the way of disaster relief funding not only toward Puerto Rico, but for everybody else as well.[6]

Tal Kopan, “Billions in California wildfire relief await breakthrough in Congress,” San Francisco Chronicle, April 30, 2019, https://www.sfchronicle.com/politics/article/Billions-in-California-wildfire-relief-await-13807211.php


James Comey

Benjamin Wittes and I are unlikely to ever agree on much. He operates within a paradigm of law that I view as a paradigm of wealthy white male power (overwhelmingly, it is they who pass the laws). But within that paradigm, his analysis is first rate; it is therefore useful even to me.

Not in my memory has a sitting attorney general more diminished the credibility of his department on any subject. It is a kind of trope of political opposition in every administration that the attorney general—whoever he or she is—is politicizing the Justice Department and acting as a defense lawyer for the president. In this case it is true.[7]

Like Jennifer Levinson, he does not see William Barr as having committed perjury.[8] But a difference I have with Sissela Bok is that I condemn deception, that is, the withholding of relevant facts, with the same force she condemns lying, that is, the intentional utterance of falsehoods.[9] I would argue that both have the same effect of effectively denying the hearer of relevant and correct information, thus denying that hearer the ability to make a properly informed decision, thus impinging on that same hearer’s personal autonomy. This is her argument against lying; it undercuts her ethical distinction on deception.[10]

Wittes demonstrates this, blisteringly, in analyzing Barr’s deceptions. I honestly could not ask for a better example. So read Wittes first. Then Richard Wolffe. Wittes provides the legal backbone that actually makes Wolffe’s points all the more compelling.

Greg Miller, “With Mueller silent, Barr interprets the special counsel’s report — to the advantage of Trump,” Washington Post, May 1, 2019, https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/with-mueller-silent-barr-interprets-the-special-counsels-report–to-the-advantage-of-trump/2019/05/01/54b5f3e0-6c3d-11e9-a66d-a82d3f3d96d5_story.html

Rachael Bade, Mike DeBonis, and John Wagner, “Barr’s no-show triggers contempt threats, Nixon comparison and more impeachment talk,” Washington Post, May 2, 2019, https://www.washingtonpost.com/powerpost/barr-is-a-no-show-at-house-hearing-on-mueller-report-as-democrats-warn-of-threat-to-democracy/2019/05/02/005c0ab2-6cda-11e9-a66d-a82d3f3d96d5_story.html

Benjamin Wittes, “The Catastrophic Performance of Bill Barr,” Atlantic, May 2, 2019, https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2019/05/bill-barrs-performance-was-catastrophic/588574/

Richard Wolffe, “It’s painfully clear: today’s Congress wouldn’t have impeached Richard Nixon,” Guardian, May 2, 2019, https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/may/02/congress-trump-impeach-richard-nixon


Conspiracy Theories

Anna Merlan, “Why we are addicted to conspiracy theories,” Guardian, May 2, 2019, https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2019/may/02/why-we-are-addicted-to-conspiracy-theories


Donald Trump

Aaron Blake, “Trump’s Stephen Moore and Herman Cain debacle,” Washington Post, May 2, 2019, https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/2019/05/02/trumps-stephen-moore-herman-cain-debacle/


  1. [1]Paul Mason, “Reading Arendt Is Not Enough,” New York Review of Books, May 2, 2019, https://www.nybooks.com/daily/2019/05/02/reading-arendt-is-not-enough/
  2. [2]Isaac Stanley-Becker, “‘Free speech isn’t free, is it?’: A story on a teen porn worker could cost a high school journalism teacher her job,” Washington Post, April 25, 2019, https://www.washingtonpost.com/nation/2019/04/25/free-speech-isnt-free-is-it-sensitive-story-could-cost-high-school-journalism-teacher-her-job/
  3. [3]Sawsan Morrar, “School newspaper gets Lodi district’s OK to publish story about student who works in porn,” Sacramento Bee, May 2,2019, https://www.sacbee.com/news/local/education/article229945129.html
  4. [4]Isaac Stanley-Becker, “‘Free speech isn’t free, is it?’: A story on a teen porn worker could cost a high school journalism teacher her job,” Washington Post, April 25, 2019, https://www.washingtonpost.com/nation/2019/04/25/free-speech-isnt-free-is-it-sensitive-story-could-cost-high-school-journalism-teacher-her-job/
  5. [5]California Department of Education, “California School Directory: Bear Creek High,” n.d., https://www.cde.ca.gov/SchoolDirectory/details?cdscode=39685853930237
  6. [6]Tal Kopan, “Billions in California wildfire relief await breakthrough in Congress,” San Francisco Chronicle, April 30, 2019, https://www.sfchronicle.com/politics/article/Billions-in-California-wildfire-relief-await-13807211.php
  7. [7]Benjamin Wittes, “The Catastrophic Performance of Bill Barr,” Atlantic, May 2, 2019, https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2019/05/bill-barrs-performance-was-catastrophic/588574/
  8. [8]Jennifer Levinson was quoted in Isaac Stanley-Becker, “‘I don’t know’: Barr’s professed ignorance prompts calls for his resignation after Mueller letter,” Washington Post, May 1, 2019, https://www.washingtonpost.com/nation/2019/05/01/i-dont-know-barrs-professed-ignorance-prompts-democrats-seek-his-resignation-after-mueller-letter/
  9. [9]Sissela Bok, Lying: Moral Choice in Public and Private Life (New York: Vintage, 1999).
  10. [10]Sissela Bok, Lying: Moral Choice in Public and Private Life (New York: Vintage, 1999).

Home at last

The Verizon guy was right on time. The bed delivery folks were late. Not as late as the folks delivering my furniture yesterday, but still, significantly late.

I now have a home. The next question is how long I can manage to hang on to it.


Capitalism

Richard V. Reeves, “Capitalism is failing. People want a job with a decent wage – why is that so hard?” Brookings, April 29, 2019, https://www.brookings.edu/opinions/capitalism-is-failing-people-want-a-job-with-a-decent-wage-why-is-that-so-hard/

George Monbiot, “The Problem is Capitalism,” April 30, 2019, https://www.monbiot.com/2019/04/30/the-problem-is-capitalism/


James Comey

“He’s tiptoeing, dancing and threading the needle all at once around perjury, but I don’t think he ever actually steps into the land of perjury,” [Jennifer] Levinson said. “We’re talking about a very skilled attorney who purposely used vague enough language.”[1]

Isaac Stanley-Becker, “‘I don’t know’: Barr’s professed ignorance prompts calls for his resignation after Mueller letter,” Washington Post, May 1, 2019, https://www.washingtonpost.com/nation/2019/05/01/i-dont-know-barrs-professed-ignorance-prompts-democrats-seek-his-resignation-after-mueller-letter/


 

  1. [1]Isaac Stanley-Becker, “‘I don’t know’: Barr’s professed ignorance prompts calls for his resignation after Mueller letter,” Washington Post, May 1, 2019, https://www.washingtonpost.com/nation/2019/05/01/i-dont-know-barrs-professed-ignorance-prompts-democrats-seek-his-resignation-after-mueller-letter/

Thinking of the Rawhide theme, but waiting, waiting, waiting instead of rolling, rolling, rolling

So, I’m starving to death and a delivery is late. Very late.

But supposedly they are on their way now. And yes, I’m in my new apartment. It’s actually a little bigger than I remembered and I actually have no walls that adjoin other tenants. On the noise front, I’ll be worried about my downstairs neighbors and the hall outside my door.


Updates

  1. Originally published, April 30, 4:55 pm.
  2. April 30, 10:42 pm:
    • The furniture did arrive. I now await my bed and an Internet connection. Those should arrive tomorrow.
    • Robert Mueller didn’t like William Barr’s letter about the report either.[1]
    • A judge ruled that Congress members’ emolument suit against Donald Trump may proceed.[2]

Cellular phones

Yes, be afraid. The science on potential hazards is incomplete.[3] Oh, and actually read the story rather than the headlines attached to it.

That doesn’t mean there’s actually a danger. It just means that we shouldn’t be over-confident that there is no danger. Which, of course, is a more nuanced answer than anyone wants to hear.

Margi Murphy, “The truth about whether your mobile phone is giving you cancer,” Telegraph, April 29, 2019, https://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/2019/04/29/truth-whether-mobile-phone-damaging-health/


Gadgets

What I find especially infuriating are the beeps you can’t do anything about. On uninterruptible power supplies. I try to get bigger ones so I have some resilience to power outages—yes, I like to keep accessing the Internet during them. But there’s no way to tell it okay, I know there’s an outage, but I want to keep working for a little bit. I mean, this is what its battery is for.

Beth Teitell, “Second-hand beep rage? It’s a thing,” Boston Globe, April 29, 2019, https://www2.bostonglobe.com/metro/2019/04/29/second-hand-beep-rage-thing/4ZaKQDJRJlwFDHMZJ90nbI/story.html


Fraternities

It really all comes back to the question of what the university is for. Administrators tend to think it’s for whatever brings in revenue (Science Technology, Engineering, Mathematics, Athletics, and, it would seem,[4] fraternities). A lot of students think it’s so they can get a degree and then a job, but refuse to conflate this with the learning that’s supposed to accompany that degree. Elite students often think it’s about “networking,” such as so-called “Greek Life,” but again, the learning isn’t really considered relevant. Even the “activists” here are likely convinced that they already know all the answers.

But I have a bridge for sale to anyone who actually believes a fraternity’s claim that they’re behaving themselves now.

Sarah Brown, “Anger Over Greek Life Reaches Boiling Point at Swarthmore, Where Dozens Are Occupying a Frat House,” Chronicle of Higher Education, April 29, 2019, https://www.chronicle.com/article/Anger-Over-Greek-Life-Reaches/246205


James Comey

Benjamin Wittes, “Five Things I Learned From the Mueller Report,” Atlantic, April 29, 2019, https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2019/04/ben-wittes-five-conclusions-mueller-report/588259/

Devlin Barrett and Matt Zapotosky, “Mueller complained that Barr’s letter did not capture ‘context’ of Trump probe,” Washington Post, April 30, 2019, https://beta.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/mueller-complained-that-barrs-letter-did-not-capture-context-of-trump-probe/2019/04/30/d3c8fdb6-6b7b-11e9-a66d-a82d3f3d96d5_story.html


Donald Trump

Patti Davis, “Dear Republicans: Stop using my father, Ronald Reagan, to justify your silence on Trump,” Washington Post, April 30, 2019, https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/dear-republicans-stop-using-my-father-ronald-reagan-to-justify-your-silence-on-trump/2019/04/30/ed61c6de-6b50-11e9-8f44-e8d8bb1df986_story.html

Jonathan O’Connell, Ann E. Marimow, and Carol D. Leonnig, “Congressional Democrats’ emoluments lawsuit targeting President Trump’s private business can proceed, judge says,” Washington Post, April 30, 2019, https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/congressional-democrats-emoluments-lawsuit-targeting-president-trumps-private-business-can-proceed-judge-says/2019/04/30/ae2ae6be-5b9f-11e9-a00e-050dc7b82693_story.html


  1. [1]Devlin Barrett and Matt Zapotosky, “Mueller complained that Barr’s letter did not capture ‘context’ of Trump probe,” Washington Post, April 30, 2019, https://beta.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/mueller-complained-that-barrs-letter-did-not-capture-context-of-trump-probe/2019/04/30/d3c8fdb6-6b7b-11e9-a66d-a82d3f3d96d5_story.html
  2. [2]Jonathan O’Connell, Ann E. Marimow, and Carol D. Leonnig, “Congressional Democrats’ emoluments lawsuit targeting President Trump’s private business can proceed, judge says,” Washington Post, April 30, 2019, https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/congressional-democrats-emoluments-lawsuit-targeting-president-trumps-private-business-can-proceed-judge-says/2019/04/30/ae2ae6be-5b9f-11e9-a00e-050dc7b82693_story.html
  3. [3]Margi Murphy, “The truth about whether your mobile phone is giving you cancer,” Telegraph, April 29, 2019, https://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/2019/04/29/truth-whether-mobile-phone-damaging-health/
  4. [4]Sarah Brown, “Anger Over Greek Life Reaches Boiling Point at Swarthmore, Where Dozens Are Occupying a Frat House,” Chronicle of Higher Education, April 29, 2019, https://www.chronicle.com/article/Anger-Over-Greek-Life-Reaches/246205

Google Maps is driving me nuts in Pittsburgh

I managed to get through the driver’s license process in Pennsylvania. They even accepted the evidence I had available—I’m still establishing residency, with a move-in date of tomorrow—for REAL ID.

Vehicle registration, the piece that’s supposed to happen within twenty days of establishing residency, is proving more difficult. Because I drive for Uber and Lyft, AAA can’t insure me in Pennsylvania (they did in California).

Tomorrow will be a busy day. I’m supposed to get the keys and I expect to receive the first of two furniture deliveries. I’m going to try to unload the car—I’ve actually been hauling around the stuff from California that I could squeeze into my car all this time. I will also endeavor to straighten out the auto insurance.

Hopefully, I can return to the vehicle registration tomorrow or the next day. When this is complete, I will go deal with Uber and Lyft. They will need to run background checks, so I won’t be driving right away regardless.

I can’t say I’m happy about the prospect of doing the Uber/Lyft sort of driving in Pittsburgh. I’m not happy about working for these outfits anyway, but Pittsburgh navigation is seriously challenging. Not only are there the unclear turns, but then there are the intersections you can’t actually see until you already need to be in the correct lane to move correctly through them. And Google Maps simply fails here: It’s way of presenting navigation information has always given me trouble anyway; it completely fails to provide the information I need to navigate these turns properly in Pittsburgh.

I mean, it’s astonishing how horrible Google Maps is here. It really doesn’t work.


Palestine

It would seem that Jared Kushner thinks the solution to the Palestinian issue is to double down on Binyamin Netanyahu’s strategy of making Palestinians suffer more.[1] It hasn’t worked so far and I think the Palestinians will hasten to assure you it won’t work at all.

Marwan Bishara, “The logic behind US humiliation of the Palestinians,” Al Jazeera, April 24, 2019, https://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/opinion/logic-humiliation-palestinians-190423123902553.html


Fast Food

Danielle Wiener-Bronner, “Burger King plans to roll out Impossible Whopper across the United States,” CNN, April 29, 2019, https://www.cnn.com/2019/04/29/business/burger-king-impossible-rollout/index.html


  1. [1]Marwan Bishara, “The logic behind US humiliation of the Palestinians,” Al Jazeera, April 24, 2019, https://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/opinion/logic-humiliation-palestinians-190423123902553.html

Semitic ‘snowflakes’

I have acquired more furniture, a dining room set and a dresser. I “take possession” of the apartment on Tuesday. Hopefully by Wednesday afternoon, I’ll actually be able to move in.


Updates

  1. Originally published, April 28, 6:38 pm.
  2. April 28, 8:40 pm:
    • Added what is probably the best explanation of speciesism I’ve ever seen.

Semitic ‘snowflakes’

I’m sorry, I don’t see it and I’m not buying it. The cartoons below, taken from the Times of Israel article, do not seem anti-Semitic to me.


Allegedly anti-Semitic cartoons, reproduced in the Times of Israel, April 28, 2019, fair use. Artists are identified as António Moreira Antunes (left and center) and Aroeira (right).[1]

For these cartoons to be anti-Semitic, any disparaging use of Jewish symbols or even Nazi symbols would have to be taken as anti-Semitic, even when it is aimed not so much at any particular faith, but rather at politicians. Notice that the Muslim crescent, bundled up with sticks of dynamite, evoking a suicide bomber, in one of these cartoons is not taken as Islamophobic.

This despite the fact it is the Israeli government itself that labels as anti-Semitic any objection to its policies toward Palestinians and which insists that Israel must be recognized as a “Jewish state.” Jewish religious symbols may therefore be used to support, but never to oppose Israeli political policies.

Times of Israel, “Likud minister links New York Times to Nazis over Netanyahu cartoon,” April 28, 2019, https://www.timesofisrael.com/likud-minister-links-new-york-times-to-nazis-over-netanyahu-cartoon/


Neoliberalism

Marshall Auerback, “Boeing might represent the greatest indictment of 21st-century capitalism,” Salon, April 27, 2019, https://www.salon.com/2019/04/27/boeing-might-represent-the-greatest-indictment-of-21st-century-capitalism_partner/


Supreme Court

Robert Barnes and Josh Dawsey, “Trump views the Supreme Court as an ally, sowing doubt about its independence among his critics,” Washington Post, April 27, 2019, https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/courts_law/trump-views-the-supreme-court-as-an-ally-sowing-doubt-about-its-independence-among-his-critics/2019/04/27/837c3822-682f-11e9-82ba-fcfeff232e8f_story.html


Speciesism


  1. [1]Times of Israel, “Likud minister links New York Times to Nazis over Netanyahu cartoon,” April 28, 2019, https://www.timesofisrael.com/likud-minister-links-new-york-times-to-nazis-over-netanyahu-cartoon/

Oh, yay. Now it’s time for PennDOT.

Now that I have a place—and an address—I’m beginning to try to sort things out so I can actually get back to work as soon as possible.

That will take a certain amount of time anyway: Both Uber and Lyft will have to run their background checks, and the ones they ran on me in California don’t count. But after a false start in western Massachusetts, I’ve been a little reluctant to pull the trigger on this.

I failed miserably at the chicken-and-egg problem of transferring my car title and driver’s license to Pennsylvania. This will take more effort, some of which cannot be accomplished until Monday.

The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) website claims there’s nothing stopping me from registering the car, which I’m required to do within twenty days of establishing residency. But when I went in, they told me they couldn’t do it without a Pennsylvania driver’s license, which the site claims I have 60 days to accomplish.

And Pennsylvania has been outsourcing PennDOT functions, often to private retailers. Now you have to go to two separate locations to accomplish all this. So I drove to another location to try to deal with the driver’s license. And failed.

I think part of the problem is REAL ID. The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) folks have it on their brains. And their web site is less than helpful about getting a driver’s license without REAL ID, which I don’t actually need since I have a passport I can flash at federal officials on those exceedingly rare occasions I need to.

I’ll have to see if the evidence I can pull together will be sufficient. As I’ve now seen in both California and Pennsylvania, this causes a lot of problems for a lot of people.

So while I may not be able to drive for Uber and Lyft right away, at least I’ll have a bed. I take possession of the apartment on Tuesday. The new bed comes on Wednesday. I have my present hotel room until Thursday morning.


I have updated my contact information page. I am asking folks to please use the Google Voice numbers from now on: These will forward automatically to both phones, so assuming I’m not in a dead zone for both AT&T and Verizon, your calls should forward to both phones.

Google reclaims unused numbers, so not only should you be more likely to actually get through, but I believe you’ll be helping me to maintain my claim to those numbers. My phone numbers that I have with the cell phone companies face no such threat.

My observation in the San Francisco Bay Area that AT&T has overall better geographic coverage than Verizon seems to have largely held up in my recent travels from Santa Rosa to western Massachusetts and then to Pittsburgh. My related observation in the Bay Area that Verizon often has faster data speeds has held up less well—this is much more of a mixed bag.

It’s still the case, I think, that I need both cellular providers.


Social inequality

Adam Gabbatt, “Disney heir on CEO’s $66m pay: ‘No one on the freaking planet is worth that,’” Guardian, April 27, 2019, https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2019/apr/26/abigail-disney-bob-iger-amazon-jeff-bezos


James Comey

Murray Waas, “Mueller Prosecutors: Trump Did Obstruct Justice,” New York Review of Books, April 26, 2019, https://www.nybooks.com/daily/2019/04/26/mueller-prosecutors-trump-did-obstruct-justice/


Fast food

Jill Ettinger’s story, originally published on April 4, has been updated as White Castle now offers the sliders at alllocations.[1] As with Carl’s Jr.’s Beyond Famous Star and Burger King’s Impossible Whopper, I doubt these can be certified vegan. So it’s all like going to Denny’s for the veggie burger without cheese (it’s in the “build your own burger” menu): The food itself can be vegan, but cross-contamination with animal products is likely to occur in its preparation.

Jill Ettinger, “White Castle Launches New Vegan Sliders at 377 Locations,” LiveKindly, April 15, 2019, https://www.livekindly.co/vegan-impossible-burger-white-castle-sliders/


Ridesharing

Another huge loss?[2] Hardly a surprise.[3]

Patrick Howell O’Neill, “Just In Time For Its Big IPO, Uber Loses $1 Billion,” Gizmodo, April 26, 2019, https://gizmodo.com/just-in-time-for-its-big-ipo-uber-loses-1-billion-1834331980


Joe Biden

Branko Marcetic, “Biden Says He’s the Workers’ Candidate, But He Has Worked To Cut Medicare and Social Security,” In These Times, April 26, 2019, http://inthesetimes.com/article/21856/joe-biden-cut-medicare-social-security-retirement-age


Security clearances

Rachael Bade, “White House approves ex-official’s testimony after contempt threat,” Washington Post, April 27, 2019, https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/white-house-approves-officials-testimony-after-contempt-threat/2019/04/27/ec8cbbea-68f5-11e9-83df-04f4d124151f_story.html


  1. [1]Jill Ettinger, “White Castle Launches New Vegan Sliders at 377 Locations,” LiveKindly, April 15, 2019, https://www.livekindly.co/vegan-impossible-burger-white-castle-sliders/
  2. [2]Patrick Howell O’Neill, “Just In Time For Its Big IPO, Uber Loses $1 Billion,” Gizmodo, April 26, 2019, https://gizmodo.com/just-in-time-for-its-big-ipo-uber-loses-1-billion-1834331980
  3. [3]Ryan Felton, “Uber Is Doomed,” Jalopnik, February 24, 2017, http://jalopnik.com/uber-is-doomed-1792634203; Yves Smith, “Uber Is Headed for a Crash,” New York, December 4, 2018, http://nymag.com/intelligencer/2018/12/will-uber-survive-the-next-decade.html

There is no excuse for Joe Biden. Just none.

I have a place. It’s the first one, the one that looked better than the second.

But there are nicer places to be had for the money. I was starting to freak out at the applications. And I was thinking the purring cat in my lap might be worth much, much more than all the feral cats on the block.


Joe Biden

The students are right[1] are right and Joe Biden is just another fucking idiot bonehead politician who will never get a clue.

I realize I’m supposed to believe in the possibility of redemption but it’s just becoming really, really clear that Biden is hopeless. Even ignoring his history of gaffes, we’ve had some serious ones already just this month. First, in no particular order, there’s the touchy-feely Biden whose apology left more than a little to be desired.[2] Then there’s another non-apology to Anita Hill[3] following—by decades—his mishandling of the hearings in which she testified against Clarence Thomas, who was subsequently confirmed as a justice on the Supreme Court.[4] Now, Biden appropriates the Charlottesville tragedy for a campaign video.[5] When white males wonder why everybody else is so mad at them, they can look to Donald Trump for Exhibit A and Joe Biden for Exhibit B and Justice Clarence Thomas (I refer, of course, to the Judiciary Committee of the time that enabled Thomas to be confirmed) for Exhibit C.

Lindsay Ellis, “At the Center of Biden’s Presidential Announcement? UVa Student Activists,” Chronicle of Higher Education, April 25, 2019, https://www.chronicle.com/article/At-the-Center-of-Biden-s/246186

Elise Viebeck, “Joe Biden was in charge of the Anita Hill hearing. Even he says it wasn’t fair,” Washington Post, April 26, 2019, https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/joe-biden-was-in-charge-of-the-anita-hill-hearing-even-he-says-it-wasnt-fair/2019/04/26/a9a6f384-6500-11e9-82ba-fcfeff232e8f_story.html


Amazon

Colin Lecher, “How Amazon automatically tracks and fires warehouse workers for ‘productivity,’” Verge, April 25, 2019, https://www.theverge.com/2019/4/25/18516004/amazon-warehouse-fulfillment-centers-productivity-firing-terminations


Twitter

Joseph Cox and Jason Koebler, “Why Won’t Twitter Treat White Supremacy Like ISIS? Because It Would Mean Banning Some Republican Politicians Too,” Vice, April 25, 2019, https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/a3xgq5/why-wont-twitter-treat-white-supremacy-like-isis-because-it-would-mean-banning-some-republican-politicians-too


Climate Change

Wait? Actually important news? Well, yeah, actually. I didn’t watch the video of her performance but the text of this speech is just excellent.

Greta Thunberg, “‘You did not act in time’: Greta Thunberg’s full speech to MPs,” Guardian, April 24, 2019, https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/apr/23/greta-thunberg-full-speech-to-mps-you-did-not-act-in-time


  1. [1]Lindsay Ellis, “At the Center of Biden’s Presidential Announcement? UVa Student Activists,” Chronicle of Higher Education, April 25, 2019, https://www.chronicle.com/article/At-the-Center-of-Biden-s/246186
  2. [2]David Benfell, “Joe Biden blows his #MeToo moment,” Not Housebroken, April 5, 2019, https://disunitedstates.org/2019/04/05/joe-biden-blows-his-metoo-moment/
  3. [3]Sheryl Gay Stolberg and Carl Hulse, “Joe Biden Expresses Regret to Anita Hill, but She Says ‘I’m Sorry’ Is Not Enough,” New York Times, April 25, 2019, https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/25/us/politics/joe-biden-anita-hill.html
  4. [4]Elise Viebeck, “Joe Biden was in charge of the Anita Hill hearing. Even he says it wasn’t fair,” Washington Post, April 26, 2019, https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/joe-biden-was-in-charge-of-the-anita-hill-hearing-even-he-says-it-wasnt-fair/2019/04/26/a9a6f384-6500-11e9-82ba-fcfeff232e8f_story.html
  5. [5]Lindsay Ellis, “At the Center of Biden’s Presidential Announcement? UVa Student Activists,” Chronicle of Higher Education, April 25, 2019, https://www.chronicle.com/article/At-the-Center-of-Biden-s/246186